A Lack of Southern (Psychiatric) Hospitality?

by Richard Edwards

Last week, it was announced that the US Department of Justice has filed a lawsuit against NC, alleging that thousands of people with mental illness are being improperly housed in Adult Care Homes, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Olmstead Decision.

Rose Hoban has a great write up of the lawsuit here, but the link to the Georgia settlement isn’t working, so you can read more about that here.

Chris Fitzsimon has a post on the general state of things here, but, in my opinion, his posts are often a bit over-simplified. When talking about the public mhddsas system, it is never good to start a sentence with “It sounds like…”  What it sounds like is just a surface representation of what it actually is, Mr. Fitzsimon. (I would have commented on his post at his site, but his posts don’t allow for commentary, so I’m doing it here.)

The timing of this lawsuit coincides with the closure this month of Dorothea Dix Hospital, raising concerns that the state does not have enough hospital beds. That people with serious mental health issues are languishing in emergency rooms is shameful, and dangerous, but my angle is that more hospital beds is not, in fact, the answer. 

What is missing when we try to fix a struggling community-based system with more inpatient facilities? You can bet Georgia did not resolve their lawsuit by opening more inpatient facilities, and North Carolina shouldn’t–and won’t–either.

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